Top

Tiny Houses Provide ‘Glam’ Option for Campers

  Print Print

January 23, 2014 by   Leave a Comment

Tiny house in Jackson Hole's Fireside Resort

Every once in a while, a little vacation is just the thing to recharge and rejuvenate.

According to a report by the Boston Herald, there’s a segment of the traveling public, however, that defines “little vacation” as something quite different — as in renting and staying in a structure that could fit entirely into most living rooms.

It’s an avenue being explored as an outgrowth of the small house movement, which advocates living simply, efficiently and responsibly in tiny dwellings — rarely more than 500 square feet in size. Enthusiasts say living small leaves behind a smaller carbon footprint, takes up less space and moves away from defining success through palatial dwellings. If that sounds intriguing — yet you’re not sure if it’s quite worth chucking your current house to take part — there’s always tiny house tourism.

This isn’t renting a camper or squatting in someone’s shed. These are purpose-built dwellings with a tiny footprint and all the comforts of a traditionally-sized home. Only much, much smaller.

Just look to the western U.S. for an example. Jackson Hole, a ski mecca/celebrity enclave in a small corner of northwest Wyoming in the shadow of the Grand Tetons, is known for its stunning landscape, great skiing, outdoor activity options and refined dining. It’s also home to the Fireside Resort at Jackson Hole Campground, where you can experience tiny tourism.

The Fireside cabins combine the rustic aesthetic of Jackson’s original settlers with modern design and indulgent elegance. Each of the 20 cabins has a fireplace, a private deck, a full kitchen and a bedroom — boasting super plush-top mattresses, luxury linens, goose down pillows and European style duvets. Wall-mounted HDTVs and Wi-Fi ensures that this little getaway doesn’t cut visitors off from civilization.

The cabins, by tiny house builders Wheelhaus, are based on that company’s Wedge design — featuring an angled roof that starts low in the back and rises to 17 feet in the front living room. The front of the cabin is almost entirely glass, which leads out to a deck.

For the full story click here.

[Slashdot] [Digg] [Reddit] [Facebook] [Google] [StumbleUpon]

Comments

Feel free to leave a comment...
and oh, if you want a pic to show with your comment, go get a gravatar!





*

Bottom